Investing to Save - KPMG and Mental Health Australia report - May 2018

At Mental Health Australia our vision is for mentally healthy people, and mentally healthy communities. Investing to Save presents a major contribution towards that vision. It shows how we can, with the right targeted investments, improve the mental health of our community, and in turn the mental wealth of the nation.

There have been many reviews, inquires and other various investigations into Australia’s mental health system. But this is a report unlike any other.

Investing to Save: The economic benefits for Australia of investment in mental health reform, tackles a set of complex issues from a new perspective, and a new pragmatic approach to the scale of the task of reforming our mental health system.

Refine

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan is currently on leave and has invited colleagues to provide a guest blog each week. This week’s guest blog comes from Josh Fear, our Acting Deputy CEO at Mental Health Australia.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan is currently on leave and has invited colleagues to provide a guest blog each week. These blogs are the views of each guest blogger and not the opinions of Mental Health Australia. This week’s guest blog comes from Barry Sandison, Director (CEO), Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.’.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    In the absence of our CEO Frank Quinlan while he takes leave, we bring you our first guest blog ‘World Health Organization QualityRights initiative to transform services and promote rights’.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    As I have flagged previously, I will be taking a break over the next six weeks.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Today we are submitting our final submission to the Productivity Commission Inquiry into NDIS Costs. If you have been reading these updates regularly you will know that this has become something of an obsession for us, as arrangements of the psychosocial compenent of the NDIS have been so complex and fast moving, and the interface with the rest of the mental health system has been so poorly examined.

  • Submission

    Mental Health Australia has lodged a comprehensive response to the Productivity Commission’s Position Paper on its NDIS Costs study.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Not peer work alone, not peer work to replace other practitioners, not peer work to save money on wages, but peer workers with a set of skills and expertise to work alongside other mental health workers in a wide variety of settings.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    For Australia’s mental health sector the saying ‘change is the only constant’ rings very true, and is likely to do so for some time yet. We’re all doing our best to strike the right balance between getting on with the important job at hand, while also responding to changes, and preparing for what we know, or hope, is likely to come.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    The screens and newsfeeds we spend so much of our time and energy on seem to be replete with tragedy. It’s hard to imagine we could be more exposed to the daily hardships and disasters, large and small that afflict communities across the globe. Communities we are all part of in this globally connected world.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    I was very pleased to see the Productivity Commission release its position paper on NDIS Costs this week. For a long time now we have been talking about the risk of the NDIS becoming an oasis in the middle of a desert, and it appears our analogy has been acknowledged and heard.

Pages