Investing to Save - KPMG and Mental Health Australia report - May 2018

At Mental Health Australia our vision is for mentally healthy people, and mentally healthy communities. Investing to Save presents a major contribution towards that vision. It shows how we can, with the right targeted investments, improve the mental health of our community, and in turn the mental wealth of the nation.

There have been many reviews, inquires and other various investigations into Australia’s mental health system. But this is a report unlike any other.

Investing to Save: The economic benefits for Australia of investment in mental health reform, tackles a set of complex issues from a new perspective, and a new pragmatic approach to the scale of the task of reforming our mental health system.

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  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Good reports should carry weight and help drive policy, reform and eventually outcomes… And the recent release of the Report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health certainly has the opportunity to do just that. This UN Special Report lays out some very clear challenges to member states (including Australia), so I’ll let it speak for itself rather than interpret too much.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    When it comes to raising issues and making recommendations to government about the provision of services under the NDIS for people with psychosocial disabilities related to a mental health condition, we’ve weighed in heavily from the very beginning. We’ve always said the NDIS has great potential to improve the lives of a relatively small population of people with psychosocial disability who have historically missed out on the supports they need to live contributing lives. But we’ve also recognised a range of policy and operational issues around its implementation that simply must be addressed, and appreciate being able to make recommendations for the right change. So just recently, when we were given another opportunity for input, we enthusiastically provided more detail around our recommendation for a much-needed recovery oriented philosophy to be incorporated into the assessment process for access to the NDIS.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Former U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, once said: “I have two kinds of problems: the urgent and the important. The urgent are not important, and the important are never urgent.” The “Eisenhower Principle” is said to be how he organized his workload and priorities.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Many of us commenced the week confronted by the CCTV footage of Miriam Merten in such a distressed and distressing state in one of our mental health facilities.

  • Submission

    This supplementary submission, prepared for the Joint Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme in response to its question on what needs to change for the Scheme to have a recovery focus for people with psychosocial disability. The submission sets out the various legislative provisions that are not conducive to recovery-oriented practice and provides options for addressing that. The submission was jointly made by Mental Health Australia, the Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia and Community Mental Health Australia following our joint appearance before the Committee in Melbourne on 28 April 2017.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    As Budget day approaches, there is usually a mixture of excitement and dread that builds among those with an interest in budget outcomes – excitement that maybe this budget will be the one to allocate much needed resources; dread that maybe this year will be the one that takes away the resources so vital to a particular project or program.

  • Submission

    This document details some of the key measures in the 2017-18 Federal Budget that are likely to be of interest to mental health stakeholders. See Mental Health Australia’s press release welcoming the Budget initiatives on mental health.

  • Submission

    Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan delivered an opening statement to the Joint Standing Committee’s public hearing on the National Disability Insurance Scheme on 28 April 2017 in Melbourne…

  • Submission

    Opening statement for Senate Standing Committee hearing on 21 April 2017

  • Submission

    In its submission, Mental Health Australia highlights that the mental health sector has had no involvement in setting prices for psychosocial supports provided through the NDIS. As a result, current pricing constraints are creating a challenging business environment for providers and pressure to reduce the quality and scope of services, and to hire less skilled and qualified staff. To rectify this, it calls for the NDIA to include services providers, consumers and carers in setting and reviewing the price of psychosocial supports for NDIS participants.

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