suicide prevention

Newsletters / Bulletins

Yesterday, Mental Health Australia staff took part in a traditional ‘healing circle’, a NAIDOC Week event exploring Aboriginal cultural beliefs around healing or ‘recovery’ and its links to country and community. Aunty Matilda spoke about how, in her own culture, the emphasis is not on the illness, problem or dysfunctional behaviour that needs to be fixed...

Newsletters / Bulletins

This week, the political discourse has included allegations of sexist comments and abuse in the Australian Senate. Subsequently, on ABC breakfast radio, the Senator accused of this sexist abuse said the following...

Newsletters / Bulletins

To know where we’re going, it’s sometimes good to look back at where we’ve come from. And more importantly, look at how far we’ve come. Five years of budget summaries for mental health. Some years with not much joy at all, some with more, and always more to do no matter what the result.

Media Releases

Mental Health Australia has renewed its call for the development of long term suicide reduction targets following today’s release of devastating suicide data...

General

There are so many opportunities to get involved in suicide prevention in this country, ranging from running a community event, to learning how to tell your story in a public forum, influencing local government to take action or to seeking employment in the sector itself. Yet it’s important that those who have been touched by suicide are ready both emotionally and mentally to lend their support. In this article, Tracy McCown shares guidance developed by Suicide Prevention Australia for their national Lived Experience Network.

Media Releases

This World Suicide Prevention Day, Mental Health Australia is calling on governments across the country to focus on preventing suicide as an integral part of a national mental health reform agenda. “More people die by suicide than on our roads. Despite this, suicide prevention does not attract anywhere near the same level of public attention or funding,” Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan said. “Suicide can be prevented, it just takes leadership and careful investment to make a meaningful change.”

General

Perspectives Newsletter - December 2014. What are the experiences of Australians who have attempted suicide? Much of the research into suicide and suicide prevention has focused on expert opinion, quantitative studies, or data from other countries. There is a gap in the literature regarding the exploration of the stories of Australians who attempt suicide and how such lived experience can inform improvements to our suicide prevention efforts.

General

Perspectives Newsletter - December 2014. Many organisations have a growing awareness of the important role that inclusive practice plays in the efficacy of their mental health and suicide prevention initiatives. There is widespread enthusiasm for developing services that can respond deliberately to a diversity of bodies, genders, sexualities, and relationships. In this context, understanding the specific needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and intersex (LGBTI) people becomes critical to positive health outcomes.

General

Perspectives Newsletter - October 2014. Calls to suicide crisis lines are increasing. When will they be funded as core infrastructure for suicide prevention?

Media Releases

Systemic reform of the mental health system is the best way to prevent suicide, according to Mental Health Australia. Today is World Suicide Prevention Day, highlighting the need for governments and the community to change the way we deal with mental illness. “Suicide can be prevented - but the current mental health system needs to be refashioned to prioritise prevention and to provide an immediate and appropriate response for those in crisis, ” Mental Health Australia CEO, Frank Quinlan said

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