Newsletter

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Perspectives Newsletter - May/June 2015. The Ripple Project is a 5-year study funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council. It aims to develop an innovative, systematic and affordable approach to improving mental health for young people aged 12‐17 years living in ‘out of home care’, including those from Aboriginal and culturally and linguistically diverse communities. With such a high proportion of young people in out of home care experiencing difficulties, carers and residential care workers will be helped in providing good quality and emotionally attuned care if they have access to advice and support from skilled mental health practitioners.

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Perspectives Newsletter - May/June 2015.The role of nutrition in both the origin and the management of mental health disorders is a rapidly growing area of research. Mental health disorders can be seen through the lens of a lifecourse perspective, which requires an integrated approach to management of exposure to risk factors, the delivery of preventive interventions, and the treatment of symptomatic disease. This article explores how nutrition is important across each of these domains.

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Perspectives Newsletter - May/June 2015. While the number of people with mental and behavioural problems is similar across the nation – around 20 per cent – suicide rates are 66 per cent higher in country areas than they are in the cities. This suggests that the mental health of people in rural and remote areas is a major issue (despite the prevalence data) and should be given special consideration by governments.

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Perspectives Newsletter - May/June 2015. This year, the Mental Health Carers Voice program has started hosting monthly drop-in sessions to provide carers with an avenue for sharing and exchanging information about the National Disability Insurance Scheme, which commenced in the ACT on 1 July 2014. This article explores a method of engaging with carers that has been trialled by Carers ACT’s Mental Health Carers Voice program since January 2015. While the trial period is still in its early days, evidence suggests that monthly drop-in sessions are valuable for carers, service providers and policy makers.

Newsletters / Bulletins

Welcome to the May/June 2015 edition of Perspectives, an online magazine where we present ideas, essays, and articles about what is happening in the mental health space.

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Mental Health Australia has been working with the National Mental Health Commission to further develop a new cohort of consumer and carer mental health leaders. The National Future Leaders in Mental Health Project offered an individual mentoring and leadership development program and opportunities for participants to contribute to the National Mental Health Commission’s work and national forums.

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Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. Children living with chronic illness often have to manage symptoms and ongoing treatments that affect their health and lifestyle. Children and young people with chronic illness are also more likely to develop social, behavioural or mental health problems. However, some families feel they grow from the experience, with an ability to adjust in healthy ways – this is known as family resilience.

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Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. When it comes to research about suicide prevention, we know a lot. What we do not do well is implement what we already know. Susan Murray from Suicide Prevention Australia argues that all too often we just ask more research questions.

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Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. These days, there are many more people working in the mental health space. We have seen a growth of psychologists doing work that was once the bastion of mental health nurses, while social workers and occupational therapists run therapeutic groups. We have community mental health teams made up of mental health nurses and allied health professionals, which once would have been all mental health nurses. With all this, are mental health nurses still necessary?

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Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. Early intervention is critical to the treatment of an eating disorder. Under the current system, in any given year, the majority of people with an eating disorder receive no treatment specifically for their condition. For those who receive ‘treatment as usual’, it is often expensive and ineffective.

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