Mental Health Australia - 2018-19 Budget Summary

The Mental Health Australia 2018-19 Budget Summary highlights some of the key measures in the 2018-19 Federal Budget likely to be of interest to mental health stakeholders.

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  • Submission

    In response to an invitation from the Federal Treasurer to provide input on priorities for the 2015-16 Budget, Mental Health Australia emphasised the importance of the Blueprint for Action on Mental Health, which was based on extensive consultation with our 132 members, consumers and carers, professional groups, community mental health providers, researchers and educators.

  • Fact Sheets

    Mental Health Australia has undertaken a short analysis of the National Mental Health Commission’s Review following the release of the Commission’s Final Report. A more detailed analysis will be released in the near future.

  • Media Releases

    Mental Health Australia has welcomed the release of the National Mental Health Commission’s Review of Mental Health Programmes and Services and called for immediate action to address the litany of failings identified. “This is no time for business as usual,” Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan said. The Commission’s report highlights the systemic failure of current arrangements…

  • Media Releases

    Today, Mental Health Australia has renewed its call for a long-term program of systemic reform, starting with the release of the National Mental Health Commission’s Review of Mental Health Programmes and Services, and the addition of mental health as an agenda item for COAG. “… We need a ten-year commitment from all governments to fund and implement a careful reform process for all Australians. Reform that involves listening to those who know the system best,” Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan said today.

  • General

    This is an open letter to the Prime Minister, The Hon Tony Abbott MP, imploring the Australian Government to take urgent action to ensure continuity of services and programs for Australians who live with mental illness, and those who care for them. While the seventy signatories understand the Government will be formulating its response to the National Mental Health Commission’s Review of Mental Health Services and Programmes, the continued uncertainty is now resulting in staff attrition and service wind down. This issue has now reached crisis point.

  • Media Releases

    Mental Health Australia has delivered a letter to Prime Minister The Hon Tony Abbott imploring that the Commonwealth take urgent action to ensure continuity of services and programs for Australians who live with mental illness. The letter includes 70 signatures from key mental health organisations including Headspace, the Black Dog Institute, Suicide Prevention Australia, R U OK and SANE Australia.

  • General

    Mental Health Australia has been working with the National Mental Health Commission to further develop a new cohort of consumer and carer mental health leaders. The National Future Leaders in Mental Health Project offered an individual mentoring and leadership development program and opportunities for participants to contribute to the National Mental Health Commission’s work and national forums.

  • General

    Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. Children living with chronic illness often have to manage symptoms and ongoing treatments that affect their health and lifestyle. Children and young people with chronic illness are also more likely to develop social, behavioural or mental health problems. However, some families feel they grow from the experience, with an ability to adjust in healthy ways – this is known as family resilience.

  • General

    Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. When it comes to research about suicide prevention, we know a lot. What we do not do well is implement what we already know. Susan Murray from Suicide Prevention Australia argues that all too often we just ask more research questions.

  • General

    Perspectives Newsletter - March/April 2015. These days, there are many more people working in the mental health space. We have seen a growth of psychologists doing work that was once the bastion of mental health nurses, while social workers and occupational therapists run therapeutic groups. We have community mental health teams made up of mental health nurses and allied health professionals, which once would have been all mental health nurses. With all this, are mental health nurses still necessary?

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