Improving Mental Health Services

Approximately 20 per cent of the Australian population will experience mental illness in any given year. Services must be improved to meet increasing demands and to ensure that people with a mental illness receive high quality and targeted services.

Improved mental health services are urgently required to meet increasing demands and to ensure that people with a mental illness receive high quality and targeted services. Small investments in existing systems and services will not end the crisis in mental health and will continue to offer poorly integrated services that fail to deliver quality care.

Refine

  • Publication

    Overview At the time of writing, Australia’s mental health sector is facing unprecedented change and uncertainty. After several years where mental health...

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    Many of us commenced the week confronted by the CCTV footage of Miriam Merten in such a distressed and distressing state in one of our mental health facilities.

  • Newsletters / Bulletins

    As Budget day approaches, there is usually a mixture of excitement and dread that builds among those with an interest in budget outcomes – excitement that maybe this budget will be the one to allocate much needed resources; dread that maybe this year will be the one that takes away the resources so vital to a particular project or program.

  • Submission

    This document details some of the key measures in the 2017-18 Federal Budget that are likely to be of interest to mental health stakeholders. See Mental Health Australia’s press release welcoming the Budget initiatives on mental health.

  • Submission

    Mental Health Australia is the peak, national non-government organisation representing and promoting the interests of the Australian mental health sector and committed to achieving better mental health for all Australians. Our members include national organisations representing consumers, carers, special needs groups, clinical service providers, public and private mental health service providers, researchers and state/territory community mental health peak bodies. Many of our members have first-hand experience with the NDIS and those experiences are strongly represented in our submission to the Committee.

  • Submission

    Opening statement for Senate Standing Committee hearing on 21 April 2017

  • Submission

    In its submission, Mental Health Australia highlights that the mental health sector has had no involvement in setting prices for psychosocial supports provided through the NDIS. As a result, current pricing constraints are creating a challenging business environment for providers and pressure to reduce the quality and scope of services, and to hire less skilled and qualified staff. To rectify this, it calls for the NDIA to include services providers, consumers and carers in setting and reviewing the price of psychosocial supports for NDIS participants.

  • Submission

    In its submission, Mental Health Australia has highlighted that Centrelink’s automated debt recovery process is likely to be distressing for customers experiencing mental health issues as they may not have the capacity to acknowledge their debt, fully understand their rights for review, or negotiate repayment. It calls for the Department of Human Services to reinstate a mental health consumer and carer advisory group to inform service protocols and strengthen safeguards to protect against causing undue distress for vulnerable customers.

  • Submission

    In its submission, Mental Health Australia has emphasised that rollout of the NDIS must accommodate the distinctive needs of people with psychosocial disability. It asks the Productivity Commission to bring clarity to the many unresolved issues experienced by the mental health service sector and NDIS participants.

  • Submission

    Mental Health Australia presented its 2017 pre-Budget submission to the Prime Minister, Opposition Leader, Minister for Health and Shadow Minister for Ageing and Mental Health at the 2017 Parliamentary Advocacy Day in March.

Pages